Sunday, June 25, 2017

Spotting on a cold winter's day at Wellington

Today has been a typical cold and breezy winter's day in Wellington. It's back to work tomorrow, so I went out to the airport to see if I could get a few photos.

I did manage to see a couple of interesting aircraft. First up is a Fiji Airways-operated Boeing 737-8X2, DQ-FJH, awaiting its clearance to line up and depart. Note the decal on the side, promoting the UN Climate Change Conference.

Boeing 737-8X2, DQ-FJH, operated by Fiji Airways
Next up is another Boeing 737, this time a B737-8FE, VH-YIQ, which is operated by Virgin Australia Airlines.

Boeing 737-8FE, VH-YIQ, operated by Virgin Australia Airlines
Last up, but most impressive of all is a larger Boeing. It is the Singapore Airlines-operated Boeing 777-212/ER, 9V-SRP, arriving from Canberra.

Boeing 777-212/ER, 9V-SRP, operated by Singapore Airlines

Boeing 777-212/ER, 9V-SRP, operated by Singapore Airlines

Thursday, June 22, 2017

Sunset from an A320

Last week I went on a brief work trip to Auckland. I flew Air NZ on the way home and the timing was right for a couple of nice sunset pictures, but facing away from the setting sun.

The first image was soon after takeoff and the second shortly before top of descent.

Evening from an Air NZ A320-232

Evening from an Air NZ A320-232
It seems that the departure time was a good one also, as the plane was half empty. I ended up with 3 seats to myself, which meant I was actually able to get almost comfortable :-)

Legroom!

Monday, June 19, 2017

Wellington arrival via the Karori Sector

Returning from last Saturday's trip to D'Urville Island, I was able to get an arrival through the Karori Sector which is to the west of Wellington City.

Coming via the Karori Sector involves flying over the rugged coastline followed by the Makara wind farm, then the city itself before joining [in this case] right-base for runway 16. No better option on a stunning day like last Saturday!

Here's a very brief video, starting as I approach the Ohau VRP [Visual Reporting Point], over the Makara wind farm, then on to the city then to land. Aircraft was Wellington Aero Club's Cessna 172N, ZK-FLT. Take a look at how smooth the water it - hardly even a ripple!

Enjoy!

Saturday's cool visitor

Last Saturday saw a Lancair ES arrive and park up outside the aero club for a few hours.

What a nice machine! the Lancair is an amateur built aircraft and carries 4 people. It looks very fast, and according to Wikipedia, it should be capable of cruising around 180-190 knots! 

ZK-EDZ is registered to a Motueka address, and given I had just come back from my trip to D'Urville Island when it departed, I think they would have been in for a smooth, as well as fast, ride home. Nice paint job also :-)

Lancair Lancair ES, ZK-EDZ

Lancair Lancair ES, ZK-EDZ

Sunday, June 18, 2017

D'Urville Island last Saturday!

This post is of my arrival into D'Urville Island last Saturday.

D'Urville Island is a Department of Conservation-managed island near the north-western "edge" of the Marlborough Sounds at the top of New Zealand's South Island.

It's a fantastic place to visit and around 45 minutes flight from Wellington [in a C172]. The day was awesome, with hardly a breath of wind anywhere, so very smooth flying conditions.

First up are a couple of photos. Probably one of the few times I've put a selfie up on this blog [be grateful I suppose!]. BTW - the clou dint he first photo was the most I saw all day!

Following the images is a video of the arrival.

Cessna 172N, ZK-FLT, operated by Wellington Aero Club, at D'Urville Island

Funny looking fella with an aircraft in the background :-)

Monday, June 12, 2017

Flight last Saturday

This brief video is from last Saturday. I took off for a short flight in reasonably good weather, only to return about 40 minutes later with the visibility reduced close to minimums at around 5-6km to the north of the aerodrome [where I was] and a little more to the south. Fun times?!!

Note around the 47 second mark where I pull the map out... I'm not lost, just checking the flight visibility by comparing what I can see vs what I should be able to see :-)


It was certainly a good reminder of how quickly the weather can change.